Baby Bottle Lab

My experience with the baby bottle lab was a struggle. Leaving behind busted nipples and many manly tears. But I am proud to say that I was able to make my baby bottle go the full length of six hundred centimeters. The experiment was truly a trial by fire ordeal. I started off by only going fifty centimeters, but slowly and many trials later I found the winning baking soda to vinegar ratio to push my baby bottle the distance. All together the experiment took me at least five attempts to find the acceptable amounts to use. The biggest problem I probably faced in this lab was the vinegar. This was due to fact that the solution of vinegar we were given was only 5% acidity. As a result of this the amount of vinegar had to be massive compared to the amount of baking soda. This threw my stoichiometric amounts for a loop but I later found out how to balance them once again.

First a stoichiometry review:

Image

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/117644570/Chemical-Equations-_Chapter-11_-_-Stoichiometry-_Chapter-12_

 

Stoichiometric amounts determine limiting reactants through numbers given and how much product can be made from them. For example a to make a car you need four tires and two headlights. But if you have four tires and three headlights ( these two are our stoichiometric amounts) this makes one car with a headlight left over. These amounts can determine our limiting and excess reactants, and we know the tires are the limiting because they are all used up and the headlight is the excess because one is left over. 

another example:

Image

http://www.chem.tamu.edu/class/majors/tutorialnotefiles/limiting.htm

The baby bottle lab turned out well for me in the end. If I could do anything differently I definitely change the bottle I used. This was because my bottle was all beat up and bruised and it didn’t look to hydro-dynamic. If used a bottle with less flat features i’m pretty sure it would reduce the time needed to get to the finish greatly. But, all in all, the experiment was fun and I had no real complaints about it.  

sources:

http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/Analytical_Chemistry/Chemical_Reactions/Limiting_Reagents

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/117644570/Chemical-Equations-_Chapter-11_-_-Stoichiometry-_Chapter-12_

http://www.chem.tamu.edu/class/majors/tutorialnotefiles/limiting.htm

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About chriscatanach

I enjoy long walks on the beach and watching the sun set. I am in a long term relationship with math and science. The movies are what I consider a man-made heaven. Most of all I think my self out to be the fictional reincarnation of Jay Gatsby.
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3 Responses to Baby Bottle Lab

  1. sweetpea1096 says:

    I like how even though this lab came with many trials with the ratio of vinegar to baking soda as well as the busted nipples that you were able to figure out the ratio that worked for you and go the distance required. What was your best ratio and why did you eventually choose that ratio?

    • I think my ratio was around 15g of vinegar to every 1g of baking soda. I’m pretty sure those numbers can even be modified to achieve better results. But they did the job so I chose them because of that.

  2. Pingback: Baby Bottle Lab | Jael's Science Blog

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